About this Show

[untitled]

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DURATION
00:30:00

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SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 89 (615 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
528

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 10, San Francisco 10, America 6, Nasa 4, The City 3, Mckenzie 2, Marin 2, William Wiley 2, Beaver 1, Jerry Brown 1, Marcus Shelby 1, Bevan Dufty 1, Jennifer 1, United States 1, Jerry 1, Jeff Chadsey 1, Brisbane 1, Berkeley 1, Archiving 1, City 1,
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  SFGTV    [untitled]  

    October 26, 2012
    2:30 - 2:59am PDT  

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room as the dream room where we dream and bring some of those dreams to life. i feel very blessed that i have been able to spend the last 31 years of my life doing it my way thinking about things better interesting to me, and then pursuing them. there are a lot of different artists that come here to work, mostly doing aerial work.
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kindred spirits, so to speak. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the
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equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interesting play on how these people make these adjustments
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half to create home. what is home for these people? the home is their cell. people talk a lot about noise -- very noisy in prisons. that is interesting to me. looking at the communication level, the rise of frustration of being caged, wondering, where does redemption fit into the equation here? [singing] i think both of us really believe the death penalty is wrong and is flawed for many reasons. the list is as long as my arm --
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about several others. we feel this is important for both of us, personally to participate in the debate of this issue in a way that we can help people frame it for a conversation. >> so nicely here, and very happy that all of you could come out and join us, you know, on this evening.
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my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful interesting, innovative group of people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are what we're doing, and then gñ@
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this really powerful group of ti so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open unoodle and nasa. it's a program from nasa's office of centennial challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is give a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by
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plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this 32,000 in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions prizes awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk mckenzie also said this while tens of thousands of prizes and awards are give out every year we've been struck by the lack of conferences or professional
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associations to share best practices and facilitate collaboration. now there's some kind of relationship between what doing here today and that. i don't know exactly what it is, but hopefully by the end of tonight and tomorrow, we can start j we're doing here can really start toqphp having an organization or, you know somethingd exactly what mckenzie is saying is missing. so this just brings me to myó last question. and it's why are we here. i'm not talking abá why we're here inca this room. that's just one side of it. i'm not talking about why we're here in some galactic cosmic sense of theá@ word. what i'm talking about is a more important part of that question. i am missing a slide in there.
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so the important part of that question was why are we here in san francisco. and we're here in san francisco because san francisco is one of the most innovative cities in the galaxy and it's a very great place to be the home of the challenge america summit, the first-ever challenge america summit. so it's now my job to introduce our first speaker of the night, who is going to officially kick off the first-ever challenge america summit, somebody who has been verylfe instrumental in creating a movement around innovation in san francisco. just a few months ago, announced october as innovation month inl-mj4p&c"p san francisco, and is doing a whole lot of work on, you know creating a@g real ecosystem for entrepreneurs, for governments for everybody to create new ideas and new innovations.
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please join me in welcoming mayor ed lee to the floor. >> [applause.] >> thank you. thank you, josh. welcome, everybody. now that i know where i'm at i want to welcome all of you, i want to of course thank the night challenge -- night rover challenge, nasa, of course, for being here. i also want to thank s.p.u.r. again for hosting it. you know, when i started working with s.p.u.r. many years ago i knew they were a spacey people. didn't realize it would ultimately end like this. wanted to thank s.p.u.r. because they really have always been host for so many of our great ideas of how to do better planning in the city. i also want to thank -- i know jennifer is here as well -- i told you when i first met you, i love your title, director of prizes? are you kidding? of course she has the longer title, but i thought that when bevan dufty and i were creating
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the director of hope in san francisco that we thought we had a pretty good title but now i'm going to change over director of prizes. i may have to adopt that for some of our programs. but that's exciting for you to be here as well. certainly for green tech, open for their contributions here, because it's really a neat blend, with the efforts that we're doing both in innovation as well as being greener and trying to continue earning the greenest city of america title that we earned just this past year. we've been pretty lucky. as i announced this innovation month, there has just been scores of ideas that has come forward about what we could do, how we could celebrate and how we could expose a lot more about what our technology companies are doing here in collaboration with so many others. but i'll begin by saying, first, you know, there are some things happening in our city that are just incredible.
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you know i didn't declare myself to be, you know, the tech mayor, even though i've kind of fallen into a lot of that. i actually wanted to be -- and earned the title being the jobs mayor. the jobs for the city has been my number one goal. and we've been doing pretty well. when i first began last year in 2011 unemployment rate here was 9.6. and just a few months ago we celebrated the milestone that it went down to 7.4. and that's like the third lowest in the state. well today, we got some even better news. so how about we flip 9.6 a year ago, to 6.9. today, it's 6.9. >> [applause.] >> and technology is leading the way. we're home to now -- just within our 49 square miles we're home to 1,635 technology companies
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still growing over 225 clean tech companies, more than 100 biotech companies, and we have ownchone of those categories or growing more every month. imgetting excited because that means a lot more jobs. i think we will soon lead the whole state. and i kind of say that too because marin county has traditionally been lower than ours and so has san mateo. i think marin county has been lower because we have their wine, you will probably have some tonight and san ma taiee because it's our airport that emploaxcju everybody there. so we will take credit for all three counties. i told jerry, i'm never going to complain to jerry brown what he has to do, has to cut is going to happen in the state legislature, because i used the first year and a half to insulate myself from all of that emotionally as well as
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programmatically to say i'm not going to let the state hurt our city or the federal government. we've got to innovate our way out of this economic dole drum and we are doing so with inviting people here. those of you who take this word challenge, and really can really seriously bring that to fore with your best ideas, this is what i'm doing with all these technology companies. i'm not satisfied with just hosting a new company in the city i want to know what they're doing who's working there, where they're coming from what they plan for the five or 10 years and how we can help them grow. as they're growing their jobs i want to know technologically how we can help. that's why i love going to accelerators, to find out what are the next five years that we're incubating so when it comes like what happened last week with dr. yam naka working at gladstone institute at
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mission bay becomes one of the newest nobel prize winners in medicine working with uc-san francisco and the pharmaceutical companies there, they're on the verge of discovering wonderful stem cell research that will cure a lot of cancers in our lifetime. you're going to see some cures come out of mission bay. we're doing the right thing, we're creating this wonderful, exciting innovative spirit in the city and we're doing it not just with the companies locating here with the people that are here we're asking employees of the company to step up, through our sf city our tech chamber of commerce and volunteer their time to improve things that are not working as well as we'd like in the city. we have on-line ability called improve sf that allows people to come on line tackle a lot of the issues that the city faces, allow for some c)eative thinking people who can't spend a lot of time in meetings with us, that can actually offer their ideas on line and we take
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those ideas very seriously. so we've been working on things on like how to make muni faster how to bring fresh foods to low income poverty areas of the city and our newest one just to given you a sense we wanted everybody to help us develop and design a new library card. talk about civic engagement. 2,000 submissions on line for a new designed library card. that leads me to a challenge that i would like to announce, as part of this night rover challenge, and that is we have been asking ourselves a question, along the lines of energy use in the city something that has been hard for us to figure out. and that has to do with what would inspire you, as someone who lives in the city to give your data of your own energy use in the city, like your home energy use? all that data about when you use it what are your hot times your cool times.
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how about if we try to find some way to inspire people to give us that]h data in some coordinated way. because if we understand that 20 to 22% of our emissions comes from1ar residential use, you can imagine if we had that data coming from every household use in the city we could break that data down with involvement of creative people like see where there's patterns where we could lessen our carbon footprint and talk about better energy use. that's perfect for us. that's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully some time after this challenge is announced, and if we can get the best ideas out there, we will be engaged with you to select the
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best answer. and if there's an idea out there that can answer that question about how to inspire people, then hopefully wq can go into november a hack-athon sponsored by green biz and others to develop an app that everyone can use. that's a great challenge. that's going to be so worthy of contributing to a goal that we've had about reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at the data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people will be creative in having thisçe challenge to be something positive for the city. i wanted to announce that, get that out there with you, and join this wonderful challenge that you have, and i think about how we could work together.
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meanwhile, in between that stuff and in between celebrating the month and doing things we have to write a proposal to win the superbowl in san francisco. thank you very much. thank you. >> [applause.] >> thank you mayor lee. >> i'm your host of
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"culturewire" and today, here at electric works in san francisco. nice to see you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around? >> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco was in need of all these different services? >> it came from stepping out of graduate school in 1972. i wrote a little thing about how this is an idea, how our world should work. it should have printmaking,
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archiving, a gallery. it should have a retail store. in 1972, i wanted to have art sales, point-of-sale at the grocery store. >> so you go through the manifesto. with the bay area should have. you are making art incredibly accessible in so many different ways, so that is a good segue. let's take a walk around the facilities. here we are in your gallery space. can you tell me about the current show? >> the current show is jeff chadsey. he is working on mylar velum a smooth beautiful drawing surface. i do not know anyone that draws as well as he does. it is perfect, following the contours and making the shape of the body. >> your gallery represents artists from all over not just
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the bay area, an artist that work in a lot of different media. how to use some of what you look for in artists you represent? >> it is dependent on people are confident with their materials. that is a really important thing. there is enough stuff in the world already. >> you also have in his current show an artist who makes sculpture out of some really interesting types of materials. let's go over and take a look at that. here we are in a smaller space. project gallery. >> artists used the parameters of this space to find relationships between the work that is not out in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons something that is so familiar like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly it
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becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now.
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you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not shown much. now let's look at other aspects of electric works operation. let's go to the bookstore. >> ok. >> in all seriousness here we are in your store. this is the first space you encounter when you come in off the street. it has evolved since you open here into the most amazingly curious selection of things. >> this was the project for the berkeley art museum. it was -- this is from william wiley's retrospective, when he got up onstage to sing a song 270 people put on the cat. >> it is not just a bookstore. it is a store. can you talk us through some of
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your favorites? >> these are made in china, but they are made out of cattails. >> these pieces of here, you have a whale head and various animals and their health over there, and they are jewelry. >> we do fund raisers for nonprofits, so we are doing a project for the magic theater so there are some pretty funny cartoons. they are probably not for prime time. >> you sort of have a kind of holistic relationship where you might do merchandise in the store that promotes their work and practice, and also, prince for them. maybe we should go back and look at the print operation now. >> let's go. >> before we go into the print shop i noticed some incredible items you have talked back here. what are we standing in front of? >> this is william wiley only
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one earth. this is a print edition. there are only eight total, and what we wanted to do was expand the idea of printmaking. this is really an art object. there we go. >> besides the punball machine what do you produce in limited edition? >> there is the slot machine. if you win the super jackpot, you have saved the world. >> what about work? >> the right design, it was three volumes with lithographs in each volume. the cab of count dracula with 20 lithographs inside and lined with beaver fur